An old cubicle is now a bold and colorful family home

Old landlords may be the source of many problems, but it’s a special kind of hell when the previous tenant was a toy company. By converting this former office building into a homely homestay, interior designer Nick Olsen had panoramic views of Manhattan, but also some very poor build quality finishes: “They couldn’t justify a long renovation of years.”, says Olsen, “So they said, ‘Decorate as soon as possible!”. Real estate property

Instead of pre-existing frames or architectural transitions, the designer relied on high-level details. Tiles-inspired Iksel wallpaper rolls turn the apartment’s corridor into a carriageway, culminating in a 15-meter-long living room with city views. “When you change rooms, you’re looking for a starting point that is usually architecture,” says Olsen, “but when architecture doesn’t exist, you add it!” Olsen did not dare to overlay bright paint, which could distract the view. Instead, Caba Company’s Barkskin ivory cladding, with its stone motifs, “just happened, but it doesn’t look aggressive.”

Thus, pink chairs, red Moroccan rugs, and serpentine velvet sofas were grouped into small containers to sit on and create a structure for the open space: “You need to create more seating areas or people will come into the room and stay. nervous “. Elsewhere, the color blooms in full dives: Olsen used a bright yellow hand-embroidered suzani quilt in the master bedroom and combined it with a blue and purple sofa that the owner says resembles a sari blouse for which his mother I was used to wearing it.

Despite all his new work, the apartment is now also functional. In the living room, a water-green wool felt by Blatt Billiards was backed with paper so that it could be applied to the walls and absorb the sound. Wall-to-wall carpet also helps with acoustics, offering a tailored alternative to another stretch of oak flooring. The designer says, “All strong gestures need relief.”

Den

“Don’t put your room on the carpet; adapt the carpet to your room!” Says the designer Nick Olsen, who made ALT wall-to-wall for Living here. Sofa: Custom, The Work Room, in Brunschwig & Linen Striped Fils Chair: Antique, Steven Sclaroff, Jerry Pair in leather screen: Antique, John Rosselli Antiques and decorative cushions: customized, David Haag.

Entry Hallway

The tile wallpaper (Iznik de Iksel) defines the tone and color palette of the apartment. Chair: André Arbus, Conjeaud & Chappey, in glossy Pollack vinyl. Corridor: vintage Persian, oriental bazaar rugs. Lamps: antiques, antiques BK.

Living Room

Two incompatible armchairs were upholstered in Raoul Textiles coordinated fabric. Sofa: Custom Made, Carleton V linen velvet. Slipper Chair: Antique, Edelman green leather. Media Office: Organic Modernism. Carpet: ABC Carpet & Home

This house is designed around an art collection.

“It was a snowball effect,” says designer Betsy Wentz of the newly completed Victorian 1900 farm in her hometown near Pittsburgh. The historic house was a bit sad when customers hired Wentz, founder of Studio B Interior Design: “The house was not built long ago and there was a loss of dishwasher, which led to a kitchen makeover, which led to redo the whole first floor, “he explains.

The only thing that was in great shape? The client’s art collection. Then Wentz began to create a space that would serve as a suitable backdrop. But if you think it means white walls and bright lighting, think again: Wentz removed art’s color palettes instead and coordinated them with motifs, creating a rich, layered interior all within a few months. Real estate property

Front Hall

“The salon was really kind of an anchor,” says Wentz. “It’s a very precise Victorian black-and-white checkered marble floor with a dark green border. Customers were sure they wanted to get rid of the floor, and I felt that was part of the house’s charm.”

The addition of Cole & Son floral wallpaper to soften the space convinced the customer to maintain the floor, now creating a graphic balance and bold anchoring to super high ceilings.
“It’s such an old house, but we wanted to make it modern and new,” explains the designer.

Family Room

Here, says Wentz, “we chose the colors in the lobby” and then we worked with art. “Much of this really comes from Brazil,” he says. “The owners have lived there for seven years. They have collected a lot of works of art and her husband is French-American and has collected a ton of works of art from France and around the world. So it was a lot of fun to take these paintings and works. with them “. and pull your favorite colors. “

The curtain in the room, for example, comes from the colors of the works of art, but in a fun and abstract way, joining the room without being too obvious.

Study

In the study, a dark gray wall creates an unexpected dramatic and warm backdrop. “I really felt it had to be dramatic there,” says Wentz. “And then we went with very, very, very dark carbon paper, a vinyl paper. This was the room with the worst cracks on the walls. So we repaired the cracks and used a commercial grade vinyl there with a really thin streak. “Wentz calls the room his favorite.

Kitchen

“When it comes to lighting, I think people tend to really emphasize their lighting,” says the designer. “And as for ceiling fixtures, I always say ‘go big or go home’.”

That was the idea in the kitchen, where Wentz hung not one but two large Urban Electric pendants. “Not only do bigger luminaires provide more lighting, but they look good too,” he says. In addition, he notes, “the ceiling is the only space in the house where you usually don’t have much to do unless you hang it. So I think it’s an opportunity to really do something fun.”

Dining Room

Wentz’s secret of giving each room a distinct look within a cohesive feeling? It’s about the bottom. “That’s what I love about wallpaper,” he says. “It makes the room feel lively, even if it’s just a plot, it just gives it a little more weight and a little more depth than paint.”

The modern dining-room card, combined with the traditional frame, embodies the old sensibility of the house, as well as an Urban Electric pendant, which Wentz had dusted with bold turquoise. “It has these beautiful linen shades hanging from a powder-coated turquoise stem,” explains the designer. “So it’s super dramatic, really deep space, makes it super interesting.”

Can you guess what iconic brand logo inspired this house?

Some people have a relationship of hate and love with visible logos, think of Louis Vuitton bags, Hermès blankets and Diptyque candles, but everyone can agree on the undeniable factor of these architectural concepts inspired by the brand by the Polish designer Karina Wiciak Based on the forms of known brands, the founder of Wamhouse Studio has created representations for four modernist residences that re-establish their two-dimensional lines in three-dimensional structures joined by glass and steel. Real estate property

“The idea came to me by accident,” Wiciak recently told Dezeen’s design blog. “One day I just saw a building in the logo. Then I thought other logos are also of great inspiration. I designed them for my pleasure, so it was somehow fun for me.”

Powered by the falling bars of the now iconic Adidas logo and called Trihouse, the first of the series is a four-story structure that uses the negative space created by the symbol’s concrete strips to house open volumes of glass that blur the line between The interior and exterior.

The Chevrolet Bowtie logo provides the framework for the second concept, Crosshouse, a two-story property located on the water (accessible only by boat) and featuring a voyeuristic glass facade.

Another car manufacturer was the inspiration for Rhombhouse, based on the Renault era Deco diamond logo and resembling an imposing vertical profile structure in enameled concrete. The geometric brand of the Japanese car manufacturer Mitsubishi inspired the final concept, Pyrahouse, which features a pyramidal shape and triangular windows that reveal white and airy spaces.

For now, this is just an impossible dream, but hopefully someone will make an effort to make these sophisticated visualizations. And that copyright isn’t a problem.